HTC One max review

7.3/10 AVG.
RATING



7.3/10
Informr score
The HTC One max currently has an Informr score of 7.3 out of 10. This score is based on our evaluation of 36 sources including reviews from users and the web's most trusted critics.

The "1-Minute" Review

With the buzz building about the latest generation of phablets, HTC has decided to join the fray. At 5.9-inches, the display on this phone is one of the largest currently available. Not only is it large, Sharif Sakr of Engadget says HTC's Super LCD 3 panel is “still the best in its class, and the best on the whole market if, like us, you prefer the natural colors of an LCD display to the over-saturated appearance of an AMOLED panel.” Vlad Savov of The Verge goes on to say that the screen is a “pleasure to behold.”

However, if you’re looking for one of these behemoth devices, screen size is far from the only consideration. Fortunately, the phone offers performance, storage and utility in abundance as well. Sophie Charara of Stuff says “a rebooted version of our favourite Android skin, bags of storage available via microSD and an all-day battery life and it looks like the Galaxy Note 3 could be in trouble.” It appears that many of the common complaints of the HTC One are being addressed in this new member of the One family.

One of the leading concerns with many of these new large-screen devices is battery life. With a 3,300-mAh battery, Engadget says that the battery life is “something to celebrate” while Stuff describes it as “beastly.” Their tests show the battery depletes 2-4% slower than the competing Note 3. Engadget’s tests showed that even under heavy use, the device lasted all day with plenty of battery to spare. Under light use, a full charge yielded 40 hours of use before hitting the 10-percent remaining mark. For those needing maximum battery life, an optional 1,200-mAh battery cover is available as well.

However, there are few potential issues to note on the phone. First is a lack of real multitasking features. Sony, LG and Samsung have offered a variety of ways to maximize their large screen offers when it comes to multitasking. While the recent apps display on the has been refreshed, there is little new to see on the larger screen. Engadget says “the most obvious change is that the home screen now offers an extra line of icons both vertically and horizontally, but that's as far as it goes in terms of making use of the larger display -- there's no particular feature that enhances single-hand usage, nor is there a multi-window mode to allow true multitasking.”

There is also the fingerprint scanner. Stuff and The Verge had lackluster opinions of the new feature. Vlad Savov of The Verge says “As it is, the fingerprint scanner implementation here is clumsy, awkward, and comfortably in line with the long history of failed attempts at making this technology work.” While Engadget reported slightly more success, they still questioned how many users would leave the feature enabled on their devices.

The final consideration is the sheer heft of the device. At 0.41-inches thick and weighing nearly 227 grams (8 ounces), all of the review sites have noted that the phone is a bit more cumbersome than competing devices. What you gain in battery life and screen quality, you lose in one-handed functionality and comfort. This added weight, at the removal of optical image stabilization, also lead to less than stellar reviews of the 4-megapixel UltraPixel camera on the device.

Engadget provides a summary of the device by saying “the One Max should still attract a few buyers. It will especially appeal to someone, such as a frequent flyer, who wants a big screen and big battery specifically for the purpose of consuming video and music, at the expense of other requirements.”

The Good: Class-leading screen quality, excellent battery life, powerful speakers and microSD card support.

The Bad: Heavy, thick, weak camera and tricky fingerprint scanner.


Operating system
Android
Processor
1.7 GHz
Screen Size
5.9"
Camera
4+ MP


What the Critics Are Saying...


What Hi-Fi

Overall, the HTC One Max doesn’t quite sweep us off our feet in the same way its smaller sibling did.It offers good performance in most areas, but it fails to challenge the best, and that drop in build quality is a disappointment.While it’s a solid effort across the board, we think there...

- Kob Monney, What Hi-Fi
Expert Reviews

We like the design, the screen and the battery life, but the phone's performance is only middling considering its premium price, and the camera is substandard.

- Chris Finnamore, Expert Reviews
Geek Squad

Overall, the HTC One Max is a nicely made handset with a great version of Android. The fingerprint scanner aside, the hardware is well made and easy to use. The large screen and the BoomSound speakers make it brilliant for music, videos and games.However, my main problem with the One Max is that it...

- Agent Hall, Geek Squad
Phones Review

I am not sure about the HTC One Max and whether it’s a handset I would actually want to purchase, as I can see the appeal of having such a large display and doing away with the need of carrying around a smartphone and a tablet.The size and weight of the device could become tiresome with prolon...

- Gary, Phones Review
NDTV

HTC's strategy has been to take a winning formula and adapt it to multiple device sizes and price points. For better or worse, the intended top-of-the-line One Max doesn't seem that much more of an improvement over the One. Ultimately, if given a choice between the One Max and the One, we'd go with...

- Jamshed Avari, NDTV


Prices (Where to Buy)




Common Questions


HTC released the One max on November 21, 2013.


The One max price will vary depending on retailer, age, special offers and whether or not it's purchased with a service plan. If purchased with a 2 year service contract for example, you would likely pay much less for the phone itself up front. You can compare HTC One max prices from around the web here on The Informr.


We've got you covered! Download a free PDF copy of the HTC One max user manual here.


HTC backs up the One max with a 1 Year parts & labour warranty.


If your One max has problems and is still within its warranty period, you could contact HTC support or the retailer you purchased the phone from. You'll find HTC's contact information here. If your phone is off warranty and needs repair for a physical problem such as a broken screen or bad battery, you should visit an authorized service centre or a local phone repair shop. You can also connect with others in The Informr Community Forum to find and share answers to questions.



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Quick view

Screen Size
5.9"

The HTC One max's screen size is 5.9 inches with 1080 x 1920 pixels resolution.

Processor
1.7 GHz

There is a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 Quad core 1.7 GHz processor (CPU).

OS

The phone runs on the Android 4.3 Jelly Bean with HTC Sense (Update Available: 4.4.2 KitKat) operating system (OS).

Camera
4+ MP

You can take photos with the phone's onboard 4+ megapixel camera.

There is also a secondary front facing camera with 2+ megapixels resolution.

Storage
16/32 GB

Internal memory is 16/32 GB. An external, MicroSD, MicroSDHC (up to 64 GB) expansion slot is available for increased storage capacity.

Battery
3300mAh

The phone is powered by a Lithium Polymer (Li-Pol), 3300 mAh battery. HTC's performance ratings are 1500 minutes, 680 minutes Wi-Fi surfing.

One max Specs

Overview
Release date November 21, 2013
Regions available USA, UK, India
Networks
GSM:
850/900/1800/1900 MHz
CDMA:
800/1900 MHz
UMTS:
850/900/1900/2100 MHz
LTE:
1900/700/2100/800 /850/900/1800/2600 MHz
Data:
GPRS, EDGE, EV-DO Rev. A, HSUPA, HSPA+, LTE
SIM card Micro-SIM
Dual SIM No
Operating System Android 4.3 Jelly Bean with HTC Sense (Update Available: 4.4.2 KitKat)

Compare Android Smartphones

Processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 Quad core 1.7 GHz
Internal Flash Memory 16/32 GB
RAM 2 GB
ROM No
Digital compass Yes
Flightmode Yes
Hearing Aid Compatible Yes
TTY/TDD Yes
Noise Cancellation No
SAR Head: 1.25 W/kg
Body: 0.315 W/kg
Languages No
Manufacturer Warranty 1 Year
Accessories Included AC Charger, Manual, Headset, Data Cable
Power & battery
Type Lithium Polymer (Li-Pol)
Battery Capacity 3300 mAh
Removable Battery No
Wireless Charging No
Fast Charging No
Video Playback Time Up to: 791 minutes
Internet Use (Wi-Fi) Up to: 680 minutes
Internet Use (Celluar) Up to: 497 minutes
Talk Time Up to: 1500 minutes
Standby Time Up to: 24.4 days
Physical Characteristics
Design type Bar
Multi-Use Smart Phone / PDA Yes
Material Aluminium
Colors Silver
Dimensions [H x W x D] 16.4 x 8.2 x 1 cm (6.5 x 3.2 x 0.4 in)
Weight 217 grams
Water Resistant / Waterproof Unknown
Rugged design No
IP Rating No
Antenna Type Internal
Changeable Faceplates No
Display / Screen
Type Color
Technology S-LCD
Colors 16.7 million
Resolution 1080 x 1920 pixels
Pixel density 373 pixels
Size 5.9 inches
3D No
Secondary Display No
Sensors Ambient Light, Proximity, Motion / Accelerometer, Gyroscope
Graphics Yes
Themes No
Backlit Illumination Yes
Zoom / Magnification Yes
Screen Orientation Lock Yes
Multi-Touch Yes
Fingerprint-Resistant Coating No
Additional Display Features Capacitive touch screen
Input / Navigation
Sleep / Wake Key Yes
Home Key No
Mute Key No
Input Type Touchscreen
Navigation Type Touchscreen
Predictive Text Entry Yes
Physical keyboard No
Voicemail Key Yes
Any Key Answer No
Voice Commands Yes
Keypad/Screen Lock Yes
External Volume Control Yes
External Media Playback Controls No
Fingerprint Sensor Yes
Call Management
Wi-Fi Calling Unknown
Voice over LTE (VoLTE) Unknown
Contact List Capacity Depends on system memory
Multiple Numbers Per Contact Email address, Other fields
Contact Groups Yes
Auto Answer No
Voice Activated Dialing Yes
Photo Caller ID Yes
Web / Email / Messaging
Web Browser Yes
Email Client Yes
Email Protocols POP3, IMAP, SMTP, Microsoft Exchange
Additional Email Features Gmail
Messaging SMS, MMS, Google Talk
Push-to-talk (PTT) No
Connectivity
USB Micro-USB 2.0
USB OTG Support No
Infrared Yes
Bluetooth 4.0
Bluetooth Profiles A2DP, AVRCP, OPP/FTP, HID, HFP, HSP, PAN
Bluetooth Audio Codecs SBC, aptX
WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
WiFi Encryption No
Mobile Hotspot Yes
WiMAX No
Memory Expansion Slot Yes
Expansion Slot Info MicroSD, MicroSDHC (up to 64 GB)
PC Synchronization Yes
TV Out HDMI
DLNA Support Yes
NFC Yes
UMA Support No
Data Tethering Compatibility Yes
Java Applications No
Brew Applications No
ECML / Digital Wallet No
PictBridge No
Camera
Main Camera
Aperture
Unknown
Resolution
4+ megapixels
Dual lens
No
Zoom
Yes
Flash
Yes (LED)
Additional Rear Camera Info
Auto focus, Effects, Geotagging, Multi-shot, Panorama, Scene mode, Dual capture, HDR
Video Recording Formats
3GP / 3GPP, 3G2 / 3GPP2, MPEG-4, WMV, AVI
Video Recording Parameters
Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels)
Front Camera
Resolution
2+ megapixels
Zoom
Additional Front Camera Info
Self-portrait
Video Recording Parameters
Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels)
Audio / Video
Audio Playback Yes
Audio Formats AAC, AMR, MIDI, MP3, M4A, OGG, WMA, WAV
Radio Yes (FM)
Video Playback Yes
Video Playback Formats 3GP / 3GPP, 3G2 / 3GPP2, AVI, MPEG-4, WMV
Mobile TV No
Streaming Video Yes
External Speakers Stereo
Headset Jack 3.5mm
Custom Ringtones Yes
Vibration Alert Yes
Downloadable Ringtones Yes
Ringtone Composer No
Ringer ID Yes
Haptic Feedback Vibration Yes
Speakerphone Yes
Apps
To-Do / Task List Yes
Calendar Yes
World Clock Yes
Alarm Yes
Stop Watch Yes
Timer Yes
Calculator Yes
Currency Converter No
Weather Yes
Stocks No
Maps Yes
NotePad No
Voice Memos / Recorder Yes
Games Downloadable
Apps Downloadable
Included Software / Apps -
More
Additional comments Other Names (AKA): HTC T6

Fingerprint sensor built on the back

Related Links Quick Start Guide (PDF)
Manual (PDF)
HTC One max Reviews
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Critic Reviews


What Hi-Fi

A fine performer but it could make better use of its bigger screen

from What Hi-Fi

Overall, the HTC One Max doesn’t quite sweep us off our feet in the same way its smaller sibling did.

It offers good performance in most areas, but it fails to challenge the best, and that drop in build quality is a disappointment.

While it’s a solid effort acros...More

Overall, the HTC One Max doesn’t quite sweep us off our feet in the same way its smaller sibling did.

It offers good performance in most areas, but it fails to challenge the best, and that drop in build quality is a disappointment.

While it’s a solid effort across the board, we think there are better devices out there that make better use of the larger form factor. 

Read full review

Less

Expert Reviews

A huge phone with a great screen, but the camera is poor and performance only middling for the price

from Expert Reviews

Whether or not you want a phone this big is a matter of personal taste. If you have a 6in smartphone you really don’t need a tablet, as a phone this size is perfectly big enough for casual web surfing. However, it does poke out the top of a jeans pocket, and you'll find you often can’...More

Whether or not you want a phone this big is a matter of personal taste. If you have a 6in smartphone you really don’t need a tablet, as a phone this size is perfectly big enough for casual web surfing. However, it does poke out the top of a jeans pocket, and you'll find you often can’t sit comfortably without taking the phone out and putting it on a table. It's also not particularly comfortable to hold for long phone calls, and it's not really practical to use the touchscreen one-handed.

Read full review

Less

Geek Squad

Looks and feels like a premium device

from Geek Squad

Overall, the HTC One Max is a nicely made handset with a great version of Android. The fingerprint scanner aside, the hardware is well made and easy to use. The large screen and the BoomSound speakers make it brilliant for music, videos and games.

However, my main problem with the One...More

Overall, the HTC One Max is a nicely made handset with a great version of Android. The fingerprint scanner aside, the hardware is well made and easy to use. The large screen and the BoomSound speakers make it brilliant for music, videos and games.

However, my main problem with the One Max is that it just seems to be a big version of a HTC One. This may sound like a silly thing to say, but when you compare it with devices like the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 with its custom applications and built-in stylus it begins to make sense. The One Max is just a HTC One with everything a bit bigger. There is nothing wrong with this but it just seems like a bit of a missed opportunity. 

Read full review

Less

Phones Review

The size and weight of the device could become tiresome with prolonged use

from Phones Review

I am not sure about the HTC One Max and whether it’s a handset I would actually want to purchase, as I can see the appeal of having such a large display and doing away with the need of carrying around a smartphone and a tablet.

The size and weight of the device could become tiresome with prolonged use away from a desk and it is rather large for putting in a trouser or coat pocket, and it would be nice if the device had some sort of built in stylus...

More

I am not sure about the HTC One Max and whether it’s a handset I would actually want to purchase, as I can see the appeal of having such a large display and doing away with the need of carrying around a smartphone and a tablet.

The size and weight of the device could become tiresome with prolonged use away from a desk and it is rather large for putting in a trouser or coat pocket, and it would be nice if the device had some sort of built in stylus.

In short I would rather consider the replacement for the HTC One that is due for release in the coming months, especially if we see an increase in size of the display to around the 5-inches mark.

Read full review

Less

NDTV

Great screen and excellent sound but relatively weak processor

from NDTV

HTC's strategy has been to take a winning formula and adapt it to multiple device sizes and price points. For better or worse, the intended top-of-the-line One Max doesn't seem that much more of an improvement over the One. Ultimately, if given a choice between the One Max and the One, we'd go wi...More

HTC's strategy has been to take a winning formula and adapt it to multiple device sizes and price points. For better or worse, the intended top-of-the-line One Max doesn't seem that much more of an improvement over the One. Ultimately, if given a choice between the One Max and the One, we'd go with the latter. With roughly the same power under the hood and even the same screen resolution, the One Max simply doesn't distinguish itself enough. It also doesn't help that it looks way cheaper than the One, and doesn't have any unique features apart from the forgettable fingerprint reader.

Read full review

Less

Ars Technica

So much like the HTC One

from Ars Technica

The only laudable improvement over the One is the One Max’s battery life. From there, things either stay the same or suffer. In the end, we’d have preferred to see a big refresh to the HTC One, rather than a great, big One.

Read full review

The only laudable improvement over the One is the One Max’s battery life. From there, things either stay the same or suffer. In the end, we’d have preferred to see a big refresh to the HTC One, rather than a great, big One.

Read full review

Less

Droid Life

It has a beautiful display, large battery that actually lasts you a complete and full day with ease

from Droid Life

After my time with the One Max, it has become apparent to me why I enjoyed using the Galaxy Note devices more than this device. If you are going to make a big phone, it can’t just be big. OEMs have to add in features and extra value along with the big display. Samsung bakes in in a truckload of proprietary software on its Note devices and even throws in an S-Pen with all of its goodies. To just have a massive phone for the sake of wanting to enter a market, you won’t get my vote...

More

After my time with the One Max, it has become apparent to me why I enjoyed using the Galaxy Note devices more than this device. If you are going to make a big phone, it can’t just be big. OEMs have to add in features and extra value along with the big display. Samsung bakes in in a truckload of proprietary software on its Note devices and even throws in an S-Pen with all of its goodies. To just have a massive phone for the sake of wanting to enter a market, you won’t get my vote.

Where the One Max shines is important, though. It has a beautiful display, large battery that actually lasts you a complete and full day with ease, a decent camera that I enjoyed using, and while it is big and hard to use with one hand, it still looks quite sexy. HTC nailed a few important points, but it completely missed why people enjoy oversized phones.

Read full review

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IntoMobile

The HTC One Max provides a ton of value for the price, and is a great option if you are considering a phablet device

from IntoMobile

Any way you slice it, the HTC One Max is an exceptional piece of hardware. Fans of the HTC One will be thrilled at it's beautiful aluminum design, brilliant screen and snappy processor. Sense 5.5 has some nice additions, and the fingerprint scanner adds a layer of functionality into the mix. The...More

Any way you slice it, the HTC One Max is an exceptional piece of hardware. Fans of the HTC One will be thrilled at it's beautiful aluminum design, brilliant screen and snappy processor. Sense 5.5 has some nice additions, and the fingerprint scanner adds a layer of functionality into the mix. The battery life is amazing for a device of its caliber, and is the ultimate media viewing center while on the go.

Read full review

Less

Pocketnow

It’s bigger than you imagined

from Pocketnow

If you want a phablet, and not just a “big phone”, you shouldn’t discount the HTC One max very quickly. It’s big. Very big. Perhaps too big for most people, but if that’s your thing, give the One max a try. Sure, its fingerprint reader is placed unfortunately. Yes, i...More

If you want a phablet, and not just a “big phone”, you shouldn’t discount the HTC One max very quickly. It’s big. Very big. Perhaps too big for most people, but if that’s your thing, give the One max a try. Sure, its fingerprint reader is placed unfortunately. Yes, it’s hard to take a screenshot with the volume-down and power buttons so close to each other. But when considered as a whole, the only thing that should sway you away from the Sprint version of the HTC One max is Sprint’s relatively small LTE coverage at the time of this writing. If you’re within reach of Wi-Fi, or have never known LTE or WiMax, you won’t care, but if you’re going from a Sprint WiMax phone to the One max, you may want to stick with WiMax as long as you can — at least until Sprint LTE makes it to your neighborhood.

Read full review

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Fone Arena

The build quality is borderline shoddy and the fingerprint reader implementation leaves a lot to be desired

from Fone Arena

When HTC introduced the One earlier they year, they set the bar really high for the competition. The company whose market share has been dropping precariously every quarter, was believed to have hit a home run with its 2014 flagship. Their moves since then have somewhat backfired. The One Max could have become the phablet to get but by holding back its cards, HTC has relegated it to being an also ran....

More

When HTC introduced the One earlier they year, they set the bar really high for the competition. The company whose market share has been dropping precariously every quarter, was believed to have hit a home run with its 2014 flagship. Their moves since then have somewhat backfired. The One Max could have become the phablet to get but by holding back its cards, HTC has relegated it to being an also ran.

The One Max doesn’t have anything intrinsically wrong but other than the size, there’s absolutely nothing else that sets it apart. The build quality is borderline shoddy and the fingerprint reader implementation leaves a lot to be desired. We’re not sure the One Max is worth the substantial investment that it demands and you’d be better served by another phablet like the Galaxy Note III.

Read full review

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